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If you’re using an SSD, there are a few things you can do to extend its life. One of the things you can do is move the search index cache.

The Search Index I/O activity can take a considerable toll on your system drive by keeping it busy. If you have an SSD, this may reduce its life. By moving the index to a separate drive, you can increase overall performance of your PC (more noticeable under load) and preserve the life of your SSD.

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As you  probably already know, Microsoft released their “Windows 8 Consumer Preview”. Some say it bold, others say it’s stupid – removing the old familiar start-button from the taskbar. It’s probably just out of old-habit, but I struggled without it. And I’m not the only one. Meaning someone already made a fix for it.

ViStart

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Uploading has become a task on a daily basis, being to a social site or a cloud service of sorts. Most sites will allow you to upload multiple files at once, tho not all. It can be tiresome browsing back and forth to the same folder over and over. Luckily there’s an easier way that will ease up on your mousing hand:

Copy the path and paste it

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Desktop Wallpaper 04

We love desktop wallpaper on Windows Guides. Here’s a collection of hand-picked high-resolution Windows 8 themed wallpapers from DeviantArt. Know a good place for wallpaper or have some to share? Let us know about it in the comments.

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The computers I work on every day are cooled by an on-board water cooled heat exchanger—without water cooling (WC), they’d either run slowly (best case) or overheat and shut down (worst case.) Outside the enterprise, liquid cooling isn’t as necessary but, for around $100 US, you too can enjoy liquid cooling technology on your overclocked home rig. In this guide, we’ll cover the basics on liquid cooling  and explain why liquid cooling is superior to air cooling. We’ll then look into why you really don’t need liquid cooling for your home PC—but don’t let that stop you!

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Note: To get a better understanding of Windows Registry basics, read this guide.

If you’re somewhat familiar with the Windows Registry, you’ve no doubt seen references to HKCR, HKCU, HKLM, HKU, and HKCC. These abbreviations represent the five root keys in the Windows Registry:

  • HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT (HKCR)
  • HKEY_CURRENT_USER (HKCU)
  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE (HKLM)
  • HKEY_USERS (HKU)
  • HKEY_CURRENT_CONFIG (HKCC)
You can view these by opening the Windows Registry Editor (Click Start, type regedit, and pres Enter):

This guide explains the basics on what each root key represents and what settings you can expect to find under each. I wrote this guide to help clarify the fundamentals of the registry and provide insight into what each root key does.

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