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Turn off User Account Control in Windows Vista

If you feel confident with taking control of security, you probably don’t need the User Account Control (UAC) that comes with Microsoft Windows Vista. This guide will show you how to turn off the UAC so that it doesn’t bother you any more.

1. Open the Start Menu and select Control Panel.

Turn off User Account Control in Windows Vista

2. Now select User Accounts

Turn off User Account Control in Windows Vista

3. Select Turn User Account Control on or off

Turn off User Account Control in Windows Vista

4. Uncheck the box next to “Use User Account Control (UAC)…” and press OK

Turn off User Account Control in Windows Vista

You will now be asked to restart your computer to activate your changes. After your computer is restarted you won’t be bothered anymore by the UAC.

If you want to enable the User Account Control again, you simply repeat the above process and at step 4 recheck the box next to “Use User Account Control (UAC)…” and press OK.



About Rich

Rich is the owner and creator of Windows Guides; he spends his time breaking things on his PC so he can write how-to guides to fix the problems he creates.

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Comments

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  • How to disable Windows Vista U

    […] Sir David wrote an interesting post today onHere#8217s a quick excerptIf you feel confident with taking control of security, you probably don’t need the User Account Control (UAC) that comes with Microsoft Windows Vista. This guide will show you how to turn off the UAC so that it doesn’t bother you any #8230 […]

  • Angad

    Yeah, I Really used to get annoyed with all those Pop-Ups Popping up!

  • Angad

    Yeah, I Really used to get annoyed with all those Pop-Ups Popping up!

  • Angad

    Yeah, I Really used to get annoyed with all those Pop-Ups Popping up!

  • Rich

    Yeah, it gets old after a while!

  • Yeah, it gets old after a while!

  • Yeah, it gets old after a while!

  • HL

    Very useful!

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  • shure?

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  • Laura Vincent

    Thank you f or this fun site

  • Laura Vincent

    Thank you f or this fun site

  • Laura Vincent

    Thank you f or this fun site

  • antony

    mine wont let me change the name of the adminstrator or turn off the uac any ideas i am logged in as the adminstrater but its just named itself sony/s

  • mine wont let me change the name of the adminstrator or turn off the uac any ideas i am logged in as the adminstrater but its just named itself sony/s

  • Carey Harrison

    UAC is so annoying and I never got a Virus on XP, so what will change? Tahnk you!

  • Carey Harrison

    UAC is so annoying and I never got a Virus on XP, so what will change? Tahnk you!

  • Carey Harrison

    UAC is so annoying and I never got a Virus on XP, so what will change? Tahnk you!

  • Jim

    I find the UAC aggrevating. I recently bought a Vista computer, logged in as admin, and got a lovely popup telling me I didn’t have permission. I was moving a text file from c:downloads to usernamedocuments. The UAC is not a security thing, its to cause more burst blood vessles. :-( I don’t use Windows firewall either. So I am not worried about it not updating by turning off UAC. User security is a good idea, but the UAC is very poorly implemented. I have worked on non-Windows operating systems, such as Unicos, and the security on those systems was much better.

  • Jim

    I find the UAC aggrevating. I recently bought a Vista computer, logged in as admin, and got a lovely popup telling me I didn’t have permission. I was moving a text file from c:downloads to usernamedocuments. The UAC is not a security thing, its to cause more burst blood vessles. :-( I don’t use Windows firewall either. So I am not worried about it not updating by turning off UAC. User security is a good idea, but the UAC is very poorly implemented. I have worked on non-Windows operating systems, such as Unicos, and the security on those systems was much better.

    • I agree Jim. Windows 7’s UAC looks to be much better already.

  • Jim

    I find the UAC aggrevating. I recently bought a Vista computer, logged in as admin, and got a lovely popup telling me I didn’t have permission. I was moving a text file from c:\downloads to username\documents. The UAC is not a security thing, its to cause more burst blood vessles. :-( I don’t use Windows firewall either. So I am not worried about it not updating by turning off UAC. User security is a good idea, but the UAC is very poorly implemented. I have worked on non-Windows operating systems, such as Unicos, and the security on those systems was much better.

    • I agree Jim. Windows 7’s UAC looks to be much better already.

  • Rich

    I agree Jim. Windows 7’s UAC looks to be much better already.

  • Jim

    New weirdness from Vista. New for me anyway. I have a WinXP hard drive, from a previous desktop computer, in an external usb case. I was going to copy more files over to my Vista computer. But the Vista machine claimed the WinXP drive needing formatting, nothing was there. 80 gigabytes, nothing there.

    I shut down the Vista machine, and plugged the external usb drive case into my WinXP laptop. It saw the files just fine, and didn’t claim it needed formatting.

  • Jim

    New weirdness from Vista. New for me anyway. I have a WinXP hard drive, from a previous desktop computer, in an external usb case. I was going to copy more files over to my Vista computer. But the Vista machine claimed the WinXP drive needing formatting, nothing was there. 80 gigabytes, nothing there.

    I shut down the Vista machine, and plugged the external usb drive case into my WinXP laptop. It saw the files just fine, and didn’t claim it needed formatting.

    • @Jim – If you set up a user, in Vista, with the same credentials as your XP installation, you may find you can access the files.

  • Jim

    New weirdness from Vista. New for me anyway. I have a WinXP hard drive, from a previous desktop computer, in an external usb case. I was going to copy more files over to my Vista computer. But the Vista machine claimed the WinXP drive needing formatting, nothing was there. 80 gigabytes, nothing there.

    I shut down the Vista machine, and plugged the external usb drive case into my WinXP laptop. It saw the files just fine, and didn’t claim it needed formatting.

    • @Jim – If you set up a user, in Vista, with the same credentials as your XP installation, you may find you can access the files.

  • Rich

    @Jim – If you set up a user, in Vista, with the same credentials as your XP installation, you may find you can access the files.

  • Dan

    For some reason when I check this box and click ok, it does not enable user account control. I go back and the box is unchecked still.

  • Dan

    For some reason when I check this box and click ok, it does not enable user account control. I go back and the box is unchecked still.

  • Dan

    For some reason when I check this box and click ok, it does not enable user account control. I go back and the box is unchecked still.

  • Mel

    That is great to know! I didn’t realize this could be disabled.

  • Mel

    That is great to know! I didn’t realize this could be disabled.

  • Mel

    I’ve had similar issues with my usb hdd in XP…never really could figure out the cause but I had really messed this hdd earlier playing with the boot sector..

  • Mel

    I’ve had similar issues with my usb hdd in XP…never really could figure out the cause but I had really messed this hdd earlier playing with the boot sector..

  • Mel

    Yeah, I guess there has to be a balance between being protective and making it too hard to do regular tasks. Hopefully Win7 will be much better at finding that balance.

  • Mel

    Yeah, I guess there has to be a balance between being protective and making it too hard to do regular tasks. Hopefully Win7 will be much better at finding that balance.

  • Mel

    Oh, just because you haven’t caught a virus yet doesn’t mean you won’t. Coders are finding more and more creative ways to get viruses on computers..

  • Mel

    Oh, just because you haven’t caught a virus yet doesn’t mean you won’t. Coders are finding more and more creative ways to get viruses on computers..

  • Mel

    Lol – reminds me of that joke that the biggest virus on the computer is windows.. :)

  • Mel

    Lol – reminds me of that joke that the biggest virus on the computer is windows.. :)

  • Mel

    That is great to know! I didn’t realize this could be disabled.

  • Mel

    I’ve had similar issues with my usb hdd in XP…never really could figure out the cause but I had really messed this hdd earlier playing with the boot sector..

  • Mel

    Yeah, I guess there has to be a balance between being protective and making it too hard to do regular tasks. Hopefully Win7 will be much better at finding that balance.

  • Mel

    Oh, just because you haven’t caught a virus yet doesn’t mean you won’t. Coders are finding more and more creative ways to get viruses on computers..

  • Mel

    Lol – reminds me of that joke that the biggest virus on the computer is windows.. :)


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