Windows Guides Feed

So you spend a lot of time searching the net.  Most of us do and with Google Chrome, searching is a breeze  You just type your query into the address bar and your preferred search engine will do the rest.

But what if you search a specific site and do so frequently?  Instead of searching for “Mintywhite” and then clicking the images tab on google.com for example, we can assign Google Images its own keyword.

To do so, right click in Chrome’s address bar and click Edit search engines…

 

image Use Keyword Shortcuts to Search in Google Chrome [Quick Tip]

Here you will see all of your search engines and their keywords.

In this example i will use Google Images.

Click the Add… button on the right side.

image 3 Use Keyword Shortcuts to Search in Google Chrome [Quick Tip]

Give your shortcut a name (I’ll use Images), assign it’s keyword (pics) and now head over to Google Images and search for mintywhite.  Copy the URL and paste it into the URL field of the Add search engine box.  Look for mintywhite in this address and replace it with %s.

image 4 Use Keyword Shortcuts to Search in Google Chrome [Quick Tip]

You can use this method for any search engine you wish!  Respectively, if you want to edit any existing search engines, go ahead and select the engine from the list, click Edit… and modify in the same manner as above.

Now, when you want to search Google Images for anything, just type pics and press the Tab button on your keyboard and it will set the search bar to specifically search Google Images.

A great timesaver I think.



Free PC tips by email

Search Windows Guides




Comments

Comments are closed. Join the conversation at Windows Forums.


Computer tips in your inbox
Sign up for the Windows Guides newsletter to get PC tips and access to free Windows books (More details)

Enter your email address:
 

Popular Guides

See which sites have been visited on your PC (even if private browsing mode is used)

Create a Windows 7 System Repair Disc

Best Free Anti-malware

Hibernate vs. Sleep vs. Shut-Down

i3, i5, and i7; Dual, Quad, Hexa Core Processors. How to they Differ?

Intel's Ivy Bridge Processor: new Features

Submit Your Tip
Submit your computer tip to us; receive full credit for all published tips

Comments
Windows Guides on Facebook